Are Millennials Buying Homes In Denver?

There has been a lot written about millennials and home buying. The general consensus is that they are not big on home buying like the generations before them were and are. Denver millennials are no different. Here’s why.

Cool areas of Denver

Are Millennials Buying Homes In Denver?First, millennials have so many cool areas of Denver to choose from to live, so why be tied to a home they have to sell to move to another? Areas like Washington Park are a cool choice for a younger generation. Wash Park, as it is called has amazing spaces for jogging, walking and biking, and also a center for community involvement and socializing.

Washington Park has two lakes and the “Lily Pond” and carriage-ways that meander through the park, a 2.6-mile jogging path, 2 peaceful flower gardens, soccer fields, 2 playgrounds, 1 basketball and roller blade court, 1 horseshoe court, 10 tennis courts and a lawn bowling green.

Convenience

Millennials as a rule just don’t want to be tied down by something as permanent as a home and mortgage. Some avoid it out of fear of financial disasters, but most avoid it out of convenience. When you rent, the most you could be tied to a property is a year or two. If you need to move you don’t ruin your finances by defaulting on a mortgage. Instead they can ask a landlord to let them out of a lease.

Many apartment complexes offer apartments that have amenities that if they were buying in a home would make that home out of their price range. Things like well appointed apartments, pools, fitness complexes, fire pits, and more.

Money

That leads to the last reason why millennials are more apt to rent over buying in Denver: less money. High amounts of college debt and difficulty in finding higher paying jobs makes it difficult to qualify for a mortgage. Don’t give up as a seller, though. The number of millennials now buying are rising.

The Money You Spend On Your Rental Property Is Not Personal Anymore

You decided to use your home as a rental property. Great! Time to shift your financial thought process about that property from being a home where expenses are just that, expenses, to one where those expenses aren’t personal any longer. What do we mean by that? Read on to find out.

First, your rental property is a separate “business.”

The Money You Spend On Your Rental Property Is Not Personal AnymoreThat means that the income from that property, the rent paid to you, is considered income for tax purposes. Now before you worry about that, remember that where there is income, there are deductions.

Think about it. You have deductions for your personal expenses. Things like health care and medical expenses, real estate property taxes, mortgage interest, childcare and so on. Your rental property is no different.

You will need to keep track of things like improvements made to the property, utilities paid, real estate taxes and mortgage interest paid and property management fees. The IRS has guidelines and your accountant can be a big help in what is and isn’t deductible.

Long term benefits

Next, the money you spend on your rental property will give the property, and you, long term benefits. This is because like when it is a home, improving and keeping your property in good repair will increase the value of the property.

So as with your home, keep valuation in mind when making upgrades to the property. Also keep that in mind when screening tenants. One tenant that trashes your property can decrease the value considerably while one that cares for it like it was their own will help you maintain and increase the value.

It’s a business

Remember, having a rental property means it’s no longer about you. Think of it as your home and the emotional attachment will cloud your financial judgment. Think of it as a business and you will benefit now and in the future.

Is It Time To Sell Your “Upside Down” Rental Property

You had the perfect home, then the bubble burst. All of a sudden your perfect home was an upside down home that had Is It Time To Sell Your "Upside Down" Rental Propertyyou so far underwater you were drowning, and unable to sell. So you moved out and rented it out in order to pay the mortgage. Now the market is rebounding and your upside down home is finally righting itself. So is it time to sell?

The answer is easy, but complicated

The easy answer is yes, if the value of your home now exceeds the mortgage balance. The complicated answer is with tenants there you may not want to or be able to sell right away. Not right away because you probably have a lease in place that requires notice. Notice requirements won’t stop listing the home, but will add time to when you can sell. That aside, your tenants saved your butt when values tanked and made it possible to keep your property instead of losing it and your credit rating to foreclosure. Just throwing them out would be rude.

So what can you do?

If you’ve decided to sell you can sell with the tenant in place. For a buyer looking for an investment property, that’s a huge plus. They don’t have to find a tenant. No down time, income immediately. If you don’t want to sell it as an investment property then you’ll need to move your tenant out. You’ll need to work with your tenant to help them find another place to live. This is especially true if your tenant was a good one. Work with your Realtor to help them out.

Remember that this sale isn’t all about you

Another person or family is affected as well. If you alienate them they can make your sale particularly difficult, long and expensive. So, be kind to your tenants. Help them and you can finally be out from under your upside down home.

Want more info? Give Denver Realty and Rentals a call today! 303-452-5853

Can You Rent a Home You Have Lived In?

Can You Rent a Home You Have Lived In? Sometimes the idea of not selling your home and moving is a possibility. How? By renting your home and paying that mortgage while you move to a new home. Sounds great on paper, but can you rent a home in which you have lived?Sometimes the idea of not selling your home and moving is a possibility. How? By renting your home and paying that mortgage while you move to a new home. Sounds great on paper, but can you rent a home in which you have lived?

We’re not talking legally. Legally you probably can (although a quick call to the county or municipality about what you may need to do is in order), but can you rent it to someone else and be ok emotionally?

First ask yourself an important question: can you detach yourself from the home?

Can you remove your emotional attachment to a place that has been home for years? It’s harder than you think. Every room has memories attached.

If you raised your children in that home every wall has precious memories infused into them. Can you stand the thought of owning it and having other people living there, changing things and making it theirs?

One thing you shouldn’t do to make it easier to rent it is “awful-ize” it

Don’t redecorate to make it look worse to make you feel better. Don’t remove things from the home, such as expensive upgrades you made to it, and put in less expensive ones.

Yes, a tenant might damage your property, but that’s the chance you take. Keep it in great condition. You wouldn’t do that to sell it, so don’t do it to rent it either.

Access to the property

Once you sign that lease you no longer have unlimited access rights to the property. That lease provides for your tenants a right to “quiet use and enjoyment” of the property.

That means that you can’t drop by whenever you want. It means that they can do what they would like, within reason and lease restrictions, with the property. It’s not your home any longer, so just walking in when you want is not allowed.

Rental Property Owners – Get Over Perfect

When you live in a home, your own home, you can have it as Rental Property Owners - Get Over Perfectperfect as you want it. From the décor to furnishings to landscaping to cleanliness, your home is yours. When your home becomes an income property and you have tenants, you need to get over perfect.

Do you have control?

When you have a rental property there are some things you can control. You can screen your prospective tenants. You can set certain types of rules. You can’t control the day to day lives and choices of your tenants. Here’s what we mean by that.

Parameters tenants must follow

Your tenants will have certain parameters they must follow. You can decide that you won’t allow pets in your property. Tenants must follow that rule. If you live in a community with a homeowner’s association your tenants must follow their rules about use of the property, what they can and can’t keep on it and so forth. You can limit the number of people who live there. These are big issues that you do have some control over.

What you can’t dictate to your tenants is what they do in your home

What is meant by this is you can’t dictate the amount or type of furniture used. You can’t dictate how they decorate. You can’t even dictate whether they paint, only that they have to repaint it back to how you left it. You can’t tell them how and when they can entertain. You can’t tell them how often they must clean and what shape they have to keep the property.

In short, unless they are destroying your property, hoarding or doing something illegal, how they decide to live is up to them. Your idea of perfect and their idea of perfect may be totally different and you cannot dictate these kinds of things as long as they are paying rent.

So get over perfect and allow your tenants quiet use and enjoyment of what is now their home.